Another 365 Project – Day 27

These were not created today. I made these images back in 1993 for my portfolio. I used my Sinar F 4×5 view camera, I think a Nikkor 210mm f/5.6 on Velvia 50. With such a low ISO, long extension on the bellows and likely using apertures between f/16 and f/32, I used multiple pops on my Elnchrom 250 strobes.

I miss using film. There were no second chances and mistakes were expensive on a per shot basis. At the risk of sounding like a curmudgeon, you really had to know the craft and technical expertise was valued as much as artistic aesthetic. One of the biggest advantages to shooting digitally, however, is the immediate feedback, the incredibly low cost per shot and many of the technical considerations have been taken over by the “brain in your hands”, i.e. the camera. Digital can be freeing, allowing creativity to flow as well as make formerly near impossible images, possible. Nonetheless, there’s a different reward when creating images on film. There’s a magic in the appearance of the image (sometimes it’s a feeling of relief) and also a tangible result (on a polyester or acetate base, i.e. the film) in your hand.

Combining my interest with photography and playing the piano. The keyboard was an old Yamaha just before the emerging popularity of MIDI. The Beethoven score Sonata Number 8, also known as Sonata Pathetique (accents missing.) The Bach, is a collection of his Two-Part Inventions.

Taken around 1993 with the Sinar 4×5 on Velvia 50.

Tools of the travel photographer? A shortwave radio, a compact tripod, a Swiss Army knife (good luck getting that through security nowadays!) and Swiss Army watch, a passport, and a Nikon EM (“zee camera zat goes beep, beep”.) The time on the shortwave radio and the Swiss Army watch agree. The shortwave is of course set to UTC, while the watch is set to EDT.

Taken around 1993 with the Sinar 4×5 on Velvia 50.

Early morning make-up preparations. The brand is Amway’s private label. The label on the pencil on the left is upside down. Maybe something to be fixed in Photoshop?? Yellow gel on the light and surrounded the set with white foam core to soften shadows. Velvia has a film latitude of about 3 stops. Compare that to the 14-stop dynamic range on a medium format digital back or even the 11-stop range of the Canon 5D “classic.”

Taken around 1993 with the Sinar 4×5 on Velvia 50.

Marks and Spencers brand of body powder and lotion. We haven’t seen Marks and Spencers since, I believe, the late 90’s. Soft focus was achieved with vaseline on a clear filter. And a yellow gel on the light camera left to warm things up.

Taken around 1993 with the Sinar 4×5 on Velvia 50.
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